Digital Archiving Resources

The Canadian Disease: The Ethics of Library, Archives, and Museum Convergence

Title

The Canadian Disease: The Ethics of Library, Archives, and Museum Convergence

Subject

Curation

Description

The convergence of libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs) into monolithic organizations has been framed as a retreat from isolated, hierarchical institutions that are increasingly irrelevant in a networked age. The emerging prevalence of digital technology and mass digitization are also identified as primary motivators behind convergence. However, much of the literature on convergence is couched in business terminology that favors top-down management approaches and works to create nondemocratic structures with more power in fewer hands, with many of the pro-convergence arguments having little to no evidential support. This paper looks at LAM convergence from the perspective of working librarians, archivists, curators, and related staff and offers a reevaluation and critique of convergence practices in Canada and abroad.

Creator

Cannon, Braden

Publisher

McFarland & Company

Date

2013-09-01

Contributor

Vieira, Lisa

Type

Journal Article

Bibliographic Citation

Cannon, Braden. "The Canadian Disease: The Ethics of Library, Archives, and Museum Convergence." Journal of Information Ethics 22, no. 2 (September 1, 2013): 66-89. Philosopher's Index, EBSCO host.

Files

Cannon, Braden.jpg

Citation

Cannon, Braden, “The Canadian Disease: The Ethics of Library, Archives, and Museum Convergence,” Digital Archiving Resources, accessed September 24, 2017, http://dar.cah.ucf.edu/items/show/301.